Safety First! 5 Simple Ways to Avoid Injury in the Office

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fatigue, safety, stress, injury, office, wellness

Safety in the Workplace

When we think of workplace safety, we usually associate it with blue-collar work. While the risks of working at an industrial plant, shipyard or building site are obvious, office environments also have their fair share of incidents. You may not be required to wear a hardhat or steel-toe boots, but that’s doesn’t mean you can take your safety for granted.

A Moment is All it Takes

A lapse in attention or a moment of carelessness is often all it takes to trigger an incident that could have easily been avoided. Some of the more common accidents in the office include:

  • Slips/trips/falls
  • Muscle strains
  • Hit by falling objects
  • Repetitive strain injury
  • Crashes/collisions
  • Cuts/lacerations

After the Event

While many of these may seem trivial, they can have a negative effect on health and productivity. One solution is to have a dedicated first aider who can they quickly attend to minor injuries, and even save someone’s life in serious cases. In many countries, having a first aid kit in the office is a legal requirement. 

However, before you scramble for the first aid kit, try these five preventative measures to avoid workplace injuries:

1. Prioritise Rest

The effects of stress in the workplace are far-reaching and can prove problematic if left unchecked for too long. More often than not, such cases can be traced back to poor sleeping habits. Constant late hours and excessive device usage puts our minds and body in a hyper-excited state and deprives us of restorative rest.

This leads to fatigue, which is one of the most common reasons for workplace injuries. Be it from lack of sleep or excessive workloads, fatigue plays a significant role in determining situational and personal awareness. Shoot for a minimum of seven hours of uninterrupted rest and avoid accumulating a hefty sleep debt.

2. Use Aids if Necessary

If injured, you need to protect the afflicted area. Things like wrist and ankle sprains are pretty minor, but they can lead to dropped objects or falls. Wearing braces or using movement aids is not a sign of weakness; these devices promote recovery while also preventing any exacerbation of existing injuries.

3. Abstain from Drugs and Alcohol

Going out on a bender the night before can easily affect the way you work the next day, even if you’re used to heavy drinking. An altered perception of your physical surroundings can lead to accidents and serious injuries. Certain prescription drugs carry similar side effects. While recovering, and on medication that causes drowsiness, stay at home until you’ve completely recovered.

4. Highlight Safety Hazards

Tangled wires, exposed electrical outlets/wiring and loose fans/floorboards/ceiling panels are things that need to be immediately highlighted to HR upon identification. Aside from the obvious threat to occupational health and safety, these hazards could be indicative of a deeper systemic issue in the building/office.

5. Stay Home if Sick

Illnesses like flu tend to make us feel more tired than usual due to the stress our bodies are under while fighting infection. When you feel like deadweight, your ability to react to your surroundings is thoroughly compromised and it’s better to stay at home to avoid infecting anyone else. 

Final Thoughts on Workplace Safety

It’s one thing to clock in all sleepy-eyed after missing your morning coffee fix, but it’s another to be exhausted to the extent where you can’t even pay adequate attention to your surroundings. Accidents in the office are more common than you think, and a small error can easily snowball into something much worse causing injury to yourself or others. So take the precautions above, remain vigilant and stay safe at work! 

This October is National Safe Work Month in Australia. To find out more about this excellent initiative, visit the Safe Work Australia website.

To discuss how to combat fatigue within your workforce contact the WellteQ team.

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How to Transform Your Employees from Detractors into Promoters

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One of the questions we hear a lot is: how can you use wellness programs to transform employees from detractors into promoters and significantly increase your Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS)?

What is eNPS?

The eNPS approach is a relatively new phenomenon but it is fast becoming a powerful tool for savvy employers. It was adapted from the Net Promoter Score (NPS) metric, which is used to measure customer loyalty by asking how likely, on a scale of 0-10, they are to recommend a product or service: 0-6 (detractor), 7-8 (passive), 9-10 (promoter). You then calculate the NPS by subtracting % of detractors from % of promoters.

However, the difference is that the eNPS measures employee loyalty through the question: “How likely are you to recommend this company as a place to work?”. It’s a pretty brutal scoring system, with only the super-engaged employees becoming promoters.

WellteQ has been proven to significantly improve eNPS

Calculating your eNPS score

But why all the fuss about eNPS? While the system is not perfect, with several critics calling for more expansive measurement criteria, there’s beauty in its simplicity. Asking employees one simple question is a low barrier to gathering feedback on work culture and, if used periodically, can provide good indication of employee engagement. However, anyone who’s worked in HR will tell you it’s hard enough to implement an eNPS, let alone measure it.

Healthy Employees Are Happy Employees

At WellteQ we take an altogether more holistic approach to understanding employee engagement. We believe that employee wellness is intrinsically linked to employee engagement – by improving your exercise regime, nutrition, sleep quality, mental health and financial wellness you can boost your happiness at work, thus increasing the likelihood of recommending your employer.

Happy employees

Healthy employees are happy employees!

One important aspect of employee wellness is stress. A recent case study shows 44% of employees reporting significant reductions in stress at work after the wellness initiative. Perhaps a more surprising result was that 44% of employees also reported a strong decrease in stress levels at home.

WellteQ step challenge among employees from case study

Stress levels pre/post wellness program

The Net Result

By measuring stress and other human factors across our wellness initiatives, we have seen a dramatic rise in the eNPS score ranging from 18-73%.

However, perhaps our most exciting finding is that employees who measured as least engaged before the wellness initiative made the largest positive shift after the initiative – truly transforming detractors into promoters!

Positive Perception

The overarching participant feedback was companies investing time and money in wellness initiatives showed they truly cared about employee wellbeing. This created a much more positive perception of that employer.

This is just one example of how WellteQ leverages technology and analytics to drive demonstrable ROI on employee engagement and wellness.

To discuss how you can turn your detractors into promoters by maximising employee engagement, get in touch with WellteQ today.

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Top 5 Tips to Improve Employee Engagement in APAC

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On the back of a recent Colliers International report that APAC countries are losing billions of dollars a year from health issues, employee wellness is now a key business component for HR teams across the region.

So, without further ado, here are WellteQ’s Top 5 Tips to Improve Employee Engagement in APAC.

1. Realistic Expectations

Sadly, a major problem across APAC is employees working too many hours. This has been recognised at a governmental level, eg in Singapore the Ministry of Manpower has advocated a limit of 44 working hours per week.

However, change has to happen at an organisational level – managers need to open their eyes to the signs of burnout and mental health in workplace. While working overtime might help boost productivity in the short-term, the mid and long-term consequences can be severe.

Overworked employees may lose their motivation, become less productive or even leave the company.

In extreme cases, stress-related burn out can result in severe health issues and even lead to death. Tragically, this is so commonplace in Asia that many countries have their own word for “death by overworking”: karōshi in Japanese, gwarosa in South Korean and guolaosi in Chinese.

Effective leaders should discourage working overtime where it can be avoided. In some Asian cultures it is still believed that an employee should not leave the office before their manager – by leaving on time, the manager ensures that employees are not under pressure to stay at the office.

Employee engagement across APAC

Consistently working overtime can have severe health consequences.


2. It’s Good to Talk 

Internal communication is crucial to improving employee engagement, but this is something that has often been criticised across APAC. Whether it’s a corporate or a start-up, it is a manager’s duty to hold periodic appraisals with their employees.

These meetings are crucial for an employee to gauge how their performance is being measured and evaluated. It also gives them the opportunity to have transparent conversations about salary career progression. A good manager will also use this opportunity to identify and solve any issues that may inhibit the employee from carrying out their work.

Managers should proactively encourage employees to have these appraisals, as opposed to employees continuously chasing for it.

However, 1-on-1 meetings may not always allow an employee to air their grievances. By conducting employee surveys regularly, a company can allow unhappy employees to open up anonymously without fear of reprisal. This type of feedback is crucial to improve the Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS).

3. APAC Wellness Programs

The Colliers International report found that “wellness is becoming a key component of workplace strategy with corporates increasingly looking to design the best workplaces to enhance employee engagement and productivity”.

In this increasingly digital age, traditional wellness programs are becoming less and less effective. Instead, organisations are looking at data-driven solutions that can provide more accurate insights into their workforce than ever before, eg WellteQ integrates with main-brand wearables to focus on optimising health goals such as stress, fatigue, fitness, etc.

But a good digital wellness solution can do so much more:

  • Add a dimension of gamification by rewarding employees for partaking in cross-departmental challenges.
  • Leverage smartphone technology to communicate more effectively with connected employees.
  • Identify a workforce’s health issues – companies can enhance risk analysis capabilies in order to reduce health insurance premiums.
  • Incorporate employee surveys to measure the eNPS before and after a wellness program. At WellteQ we have seen a 40% in employee engagement after our wellness program.
WellteQ connects with wearables

Connecting wellness programs to wearables


4. Inclusion Policy

One quick way to ostracise an employee is by making them feel detached from the company. Creating an “us and them” gulf between management and the rest of the workforce can be extremely demoralising. This could include things like reprimanding employees for being late while at the same time being consistently late themselves.

There are a number of things managers in APAC can do to make an employee feel more included:

  • Allowing them the opportunity to own share options means they are more immersed in the success and failure of the company.
  • Injecting a vibrant social calendar into your organisation allows people to forge deeper connections with both their team and management.
  • Incorporating CSR initiatives allow staff to bond over important causes not related to their everyday work. CSR projects can be particularly powerful if there is support from senior management.

5. Moving with the Times

The face of business has undeniably changed over the past few decades. There are now a range of digital tools that employers can get their hands on to boost productivity, eg Slack (team communications),  Skype (video conferencing), Jamboard (virtual whiteboards), and many more.

However, the non-digital advancements have been just as important, eg introducing stand-up meetings as a way to cut down on unnecessary time wasting.

This attitudinal shift can largely be attributed to the rise in startup culture where bootstrapped entrepreneurs needed to streamline their businesses to make them as productive as possible. They started cutting out unnecessary rules that had dominated the corporate world for too long, so things like flexible hours, relaxed dress codes and quirky office spaces were introduced.

The startup scene is thriving in APAC and the corporate world is learning from it as a tool to improve employee engagement.

Co-working space across APAC

Flexible working hours, relaxed dress codes and quirky offices.


Putting it into Action

So that’s our Top 5 Tips to Improve Employee Engagement in APAC!

While this is all very well in theory, these type of changes are difficult to implement and will not happen overnight.

To see how WellteQ’s award-winning analytics solution can help you increase employee engagement, get in touch today.

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