How to Manage Diabetes in the Workplace

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In recognition of World Diabetes Day, we take a closer look at managing diabetes in the workplace.

A recent study on global trends in diabetes complications revealed large increases in diabetes prevalence in almost all regions of the world. In the United States alone, prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is projected to increase by 54% between 2015 and 2030, along with annual diabetes-related deaths climbing by 38%. While managing diabetes has always been a top concern of world health officials, it really boils down to the efforts of the individual. Considering how modern living sees us spending most of our time in a work environment, how can we manage the risks and effects of diabetes in the workplace?

Fortune Favours the Proactive

There are many health complications associated with diabetes: heart disease and stroke, eye damage, skin and mouth conditions, kidney damage and foot problems to name a few. When it comes to functioning at work, one of the main concerns of diabetics is the onset of hypoglycemia, a condition characterised by one’s blood sugar falling below a certain level. This can cause a person to feel faint, weak, or even lose consciousness altogether. The danger inherent in this is painfully obvious.

Thankfully, there are various preventive measures employees can take to keep themselves safe and their families free from worry:

Plan in advance

Getting enough sleep, planning your meals, and staying hydrated are can make a significant difference to your safety. They also happen to be things that can be scheduled and defined on your end. Keeping these areas of your life secure will allow your to have more control over your condition.

Know your rights

Diabetics are protected under national health policies to ensure that their ability to work safely is not compromised, nor their condition discriminated against. Labour laws do vary across countries, so do your due diligence in finding out what’s what. If it is within your rights to make a request for a small change in work arrangements, don’t hesitate to speak up about it!

Protect against danger

Office parties are fun, but they often involve sweet treats and alcohol – not exactly good for diabetics. If you do decide to indulge, be sure to keep your portions on the small side. Keeping your desk stocked with healthy, blood-sugar friendly snacks will ward off the temptation of raiding the office pantry. As another precautionary measure, remember to keep a small supply of your medication handy in case of emergencies.

Make movement a priority

Spending all day seated at your desk is not good for your resting blood sugar levels, so set a timer to go off every 15-30 minutes as a reminder for you to move. Take a short walk down the hall or even do a couple of stretches in your area. During your lunch break, try to take the stairs whenever possible to get your heart rate up. A standing or treadmill desk is another great alternative to consider.

Keep your workplace informed

It’s important that your employer is aware of your diagnosis so they have the opportunity to be understanding of your medical situation. Take the time to explain to them what diabetes is and how it affects everyday life – most people don’t even know what having diabetes entails other than having to worry about blood sugar levels. Letting your work buddies or direct supervisor in on your condition and medical protocols also makes it easier for them to keep an eye out for you.

Avoid taking jobs that are unsuitable for your condition, such as shift work or high-stress positions. Telecommuting or self-employment may be more suitable for individuals who exhibit more severe symptoms.

Keep Your Loved Ones in the Loop

Outside of work, family also plays an important role in diabetes management. A family unit that offers a strong support system can help with sustainability when it comes to certain aspects of diabetes management, such as nutrition, exercise and mental health.

Sharing a life with a diabetic will take some getting used to, so getting your loved ones on board needs to be a gradual process. Building this upon a foundation of open and honest communication is the best way to create a healthy relationship whereby both parties will be able to benefit mutually. To start:

Educate on the condition

Your family may need help understanding what diabetes entails, like the need for a different eating schedule or nutrition plan. Dropping some quick facts about diabetes and the relevant medications enables them to identify red flags and react accordingly.

Define boundaries for support

While help is always welcome, there are times when family members can become TOO involved in the management process. Acknowledge that their intentions stem from a good place, but be firm in drawing the line to prevent micro-management.

Ask for help when needed

It is understandable how those with a serious medical condition tend to view themselves as a burden to others. Remember, you are not alone and your family will do whatever they can to help you find your own pace. For this to work, however, you need to put aside your pride and ask for help when you need it.

Final Thoughts on Diabetes in the Workplace

It’s important to remember that despite the seriousness of the condition, diabetics can still go on to lead relatively normal lives through the adoption of healthier lifestyle habits. Staying safe in the workplace is a matter of identifying the risk factors and addressing them in advance. Being prepared not only safeguards your productivity, but your happiness as well!

To find out more about how our wellness programs can help your organisation establish preventative health measures, get in touch.

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Men’s Health at Work: Are You Man Enough to Talk About It?

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Men's Health, men health, mens health

It’s time to talk about men’s health in the workplace

With reports of chronic stress and similar conditions at an all-time high, the emphasis on promoting healthy practices in the workplace is now as important as ever. However, men’s health, in particular, is a tricky subject to tackle as, traditionally, men struggle to open up about health issues for fear of appearing weak or emasculated. While there have been some progress on this, thanks largely to awareness campaigns such as Movember, unfortunately these archaic notions still hold sway in today’s society.

“Male Wellness” is Not an Oxymoron

Prostate cancer, testicular cancer and suicide are just some of the health issues affecting men. The sad truth is that men are less likely to make use of their primary health provisions as compared to women. This means that even if the right measures and protocols are in place, men might not stand to benefit from them because of the simple fact of non-engagement.

Regardless of profession, men in general are more prone to chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, stroke and depression. They are also much more likely to respond to such situations by resorting to harmful coping mechanisms such as smoking, alcohol and substance abuse, while eschewing more productive avenues such as therapy, counselling or social support groups.

Psychological Made Physical

Hugh Martin, a psychotherapist, coach and founder of men’s health organisation Man Enough, says that such isolative behaviours are very specific to the male psyche and that the typical male upbringing ‘really enables that sense of isolation, or that a man can’t bring up an issue they’re having’.

Martin goes on to add that, in the workplace, men also tend to overextend themselves when it comes to working hours: ‘They tend to feel more isolated from home life, not as efficient at multitasking… It’s hard to sustain’.

Indeed, the following facts around men’s health are a serious cause for concern:

  • Men enjoy less life satisfaction.

  • They have less access to social support systems.

  • Men are more likely to be obese.

  • Suicide is the leading cause of death for men under 35.

  • More then three-quarters of suicide victims are male.

  • Boys are falling behind girls at all levels of education.

“Awareness” may be a nice word to throw around wellness circles, but there’s a difference between knowing and acting. Most employers have their hearts in the place when they engage wellness consultants or invest in corporate well-being programmes. However, these efforts will count for nothing if they fail to address the crux of the matter.

It’s Time to Talk About It

The problem is social by nature. Men benefit greatly from the feeling of inclusivity that comes with a support network. When surrounded by their peers – all of whom face similar issues – men are more likely to voice their concerns and work towards solutions as they no longer suffer under the illusion of external judgement. Once this network is in place, change can truly take place.

Of course, the way such an initiative is executed also matters. Communication is key when it comes to building and maintaining relationships, and the same holds true in the workplace. You can’t expect something as impersonal as a bunch of generic motivation posters to do the trick. Kritika Singh, of corporate health provider SMG Health, emphasises the importance of a tailored approach to addressing the wants and needs of male employees: ‘It’s all about how the message is promoted to the staff. It has to be clear and show why the individual should take care of themselves’.

Last Thoughts on Men’s Health

While it may be unrealistic to create “male-friendly” workplace environments, the situation faced by men across the world is very real. We all wish to be in good health – even the most “alpha male” of men amongst us. Just because it’s not spoken about enough, it doesn’t mean that the problem doesn’t exist. So, men, don’t be afraid to open up to friends, family and colleagues about health issues.

To help install healthier habits in the workplace, get in touch with the WellteQ team today.

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WellteQ Talks: Fatigue

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There’s often a misconception that tiredness and fatigue are the same thing. In the health and fitness space, how do you differentiate between the two? Tune into this episode of WellteQ Talks, with Natalie Dau, to find out.

WellteQ is running an exclusive offer to help you maximise the ROI on your wellness initiatives in 2019. Click below to find out more.

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5 Tips to Make You Healthier, Happier and More Productive at Work!

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Improve your work life

Healthier, Happier and More Productive at Work!

It happens to the best of us, but sometimes we just can’t bear our job! There are a few simple tricks you can do to combat the drain work has on our mental and physical health. So here are five ways you can feel healthier, happier and more productive at work.

1. Move it or Lose it! 

They say that sitting is the new smoking. Yes it’s a crude comparison, and sitting down next to someone is not nearly as antisocial as blowing smoke in their face, but the science backs it up. A recent study from the American Cancer Society finds a link between long periods of leisure time sitting and a higher risk of death from all causes.

Terrifying!

Scaremongering aside, sitting can also have adverse effects on your productivity. While you might believe that you’re ‘in the zone’ and that every minute of the day counts, taking regular short breaks between tasks will actually help you stay focussed. Splitting your day’s tasks into bitesize chunks, rewarding yourself with a short break in between, can help you manage your workload more effectively.

So stand up, get the blood pumping and cruise through your day’s tasklist.

2. It’s Rude Not to Stair

It’s one thing taking regular breaks to move around, but are you ready to take on the stairs? Researchers from McMaster University recently found that climbing stairs for 10 minutes a day can have major benefits for heart health, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. You burn more calories stair climbing so it’s also a great way to lose weight.

Taking the stairs can also helps boost energy levels. Researchers from University of Georgia found that 10 minutes going up and down stairs gives you more energy than 50mg of coffee. Cheaper and healthier too!

Try swapping the work elevator for the stairs. If your office is on the 50th floor, you could always take the lift part way up and walk the rest of the way. Even better, using a wellness program, set up a ‘Stair Master’ challeng and compete with your colleagues to take your fitness to the next level.

3. Do Sleep on the Job

If you ever find yourself nodding off at work, maybe you shouldn’t fight the urge for a sneaky nap. Ok so spending all afternoon with your head on your desk drooling onto your keyboard is a quick way to get fired, but research shows that a 10-20 minute power nap can do wonders for you. The many benefits include increasing alertness, boosting creativity and reducing stress.    

Taking naps at work is being recognised worldwide with some offices actually installing sleeping pods for just that purpose. In Japan they even have a word for sleeping at work: “inemuri,” which translates roughly as “sleeping while present.” So find yourself a comfy spot in the office, grab a pillow and catch a few zzzs!

However, you should not be napping because you don’t get enough sleep generally. You should still be aiming to get at least 7 hours’ sleep a night. Using wearables is a great way to track both the quantity and quality of your sleep.

4. Don’t Be a Slouch

When you’re spending several hours a day at a computer it can be difficult to maintain good posture. Having bad posture can cause both short and long-term injuries. Try using these ergonomic tips to help your body assume a neutral, strain-free position:

  • Sit upright with your feet flat on the floor and your back fully supported by your seat.
  • Keep your shoulders relaxed, allowing your upper arms to hang naturally. Your elbows should be close to the body and bent between 90 and 120 degrees.
  • Your thighs should be parallel to the floor, and your knees close to the same height as your hips.
  • Keep your monitor about an arm’s length away; the top of the screen should be at eye level, so that you can read without craning your neck.

4. Find Your Work BFF

Making friends at work is proven to be beneficial to our wellbeing. A 2014 study by LinkedIn found 46% of professionals worldwide believe work friends are important to their overall happiness. More recently, a survey by Comparably found 60% of women and 56% of men admitted to having a work BFF.

You probably spend more time per week with your co-workers than you do with your other friends, so it’s important to be sociable. Indeed, having work friends can have a dramatic effect on workplace happiness in a number of ways, including: not feeling alienated, being able to bond over shared feelings about the company and reducing stress by having someone to talk to if things go wrong.

Wellness programs are also great to foster friendships at works as they allow you to enter into a community-driven environment where you can compete with, or against, other colleagues.

To find out how WellteQ can help with all of the above, and more, get in touch with the team.

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You Are What You Eat: Nutrition, Health and Wellbeing

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Nutrition can improve your physical health and wellness

Nutrition, health and wellbeing at home and in the workplace

In recognition of World Food Day (supporting the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 2: Zero Hunger) and National Nutrition Week in Australia we turn our focus to nutrition.

In today’s health-conscious society, we’re always hearing about nutrition and how we should pay more attention to it. Yet, despite its importance to wellbeing, the exact nature of nutrition remains shrouded in mystery for many. So let’s dig a little deeper into learning more about such an integral part of our lives.

More than Just Numbers

Perhaps the most basic of understandings regarding nutrition involves the existence of calories. Essentially treated as fuel by the body, calories are derived from the food that we eat. The first layer of personal healthcare—weight management—is commonly attributed to the balance shared between caloric intake and expenditure. Put simply, if you take in more than consume, you’ll gain weight. The inverse is also true; taking in less than you require results in weight-loss.

However, human biology cannot be regarded using such a simplistic equation. Firstly, caloric density can vary between similar foods just by method of cooking (which can also alter glycaemic index values). Secondly, not all calories are created equal. While “calories in vs calories out” is the primary consideration for weight management, where you derive calories from matters too.

Bring in the Big Guns

Nutrients are the next most pertinent subject when it comes to this discussion. The three most prevalent ones—protein, carbohydrates and fat – are collectively referred to as macronutrients. Just as the word “macro” denotes a larger capability, macronutrients fulfil a variety of functions within the human body. From promoting cellular health to regulating hormone production and repairing body tissue, macronutrients are vital to just about every aspect of physical and mental health.

Ensuring that your body gets the proper ratio of macronutrients is crucial to good health. While this figure does fluctuate accordingly to numerous variables (age, gender, physical occupation, body composition, medical status, etc.), the key takeaway here is that it is far better to internalise a ratio rather than to not have one at all. If, for example, your body needs 2,000 calories a day to fuel its activity, having 90% of it as carbohydrates will be akin to short-changing it of the benefits afforded by a balanced diet.

DO Sweat the Small Stuff

Micronutrients stand somewhat diminutively next to their macro counterparts. Despite occurring naturally in trace amounts, micronutrients (ie vitamins and minerals) play the vital role of supporting the macronutrients’ efforts to keep the body up and running. Despite it being almost impossible to separate micronutrients and macronutrients (they’re a package deal in whole foods), the “modern” diet makes it all too easy to come up deficient in them. Heavily processed and refined food products often lose their micronutrient value, or even having them replaced with synthetic variants.

Possessing a micronutrient deficiency may seem harmless, but its effects are far-reaching and can cause something more serious. Magnesium deficiency—one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies—carries as many as 23 symptoms (both neurological and physical) and is known to be related to 16 medical conditions. Not surprising when you consider its key role in over 350 enzymatic processes and its involvement in virtually every metabolic activity of the body. It is a natural process for our bodies to deplete its store of micronutrients, so it becomes essential for us to replace them at the earliest opportunity.

Weird Diets and Nutritional Supplements

Bringing things back to the crux of the matter, what we eat is important because it has a direct impact on how much energy our body receives and its ability to function optimally. A balanced diet rich in whole foods ensures your body gets what it needs, in terms of quantity and quality. A poor diet, on the other hand, skews your intake and leaves you in a semi-deprived state. While there are some scientifically proven diets that advocate a large-scale de-emphasis on certain food groups (eg the ketogenic diet), bear in mind that these diets are typically prescribed for a predetermined amount of time, or for very specific populations.

Nutritional supplements are another important factor when it comes to health and wellbeing. While you shouldn’t build a nutritional plan around supplements, intelligent use allows you to address shortcomings and promote recovery. Active people require more nutrients, so things like protein powder and fish oil can help keep the body healthy.

The Effects of Good Nutrition

One thing to remember about nutrition, and its effect on our health, is that it’s not something immediately apparent. However, there are a number of ways you can ensure you’re not secretly sabotaging yourself. Building a diet around quality whole foods and keeping your consumption to reasonable levels, while also minimising alcohol and sugar intake, can do wonders for your wellbeing. A lot of it boils down to good old common sense—you get out what you put in!

To learn more about improving nutrition, health and wellbeing in your workforce, get in touch with WellteQ team.

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Safety First! 5 Simple Ways to Avoid Injury in the Office

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fatigue, safety, stress, injury, office, wellness

Safety in the Workplace

When we think of workplace safety, we usually associate it with blue-collar work. While the risks of working at an industrial plant, shipyard or building site are obvious, office environments also have their fair share of incidents. You may not be required to wear a hardhat or steel-toe boots, but that’s doesn’t mean you can take your safety for granted.

A Moment is All it Takes

A lapse in attention or a moment of carelessness is often all it takes to trigger an incident that could have easily been avoided. Some of the more common accidents in the office include:

  • Slips/trips/falls
  • Muscle strains
  • Hit by falling objects
  • Repetitive strain injury
  • Crashes/collisions
  • Cuts/lacerations

After the Event

While many of these may seem trivial, they can have a negative effect on health and productivity. One solution is to have a dedicated first aider who can they quickly attend to minor injuries, and even save someone’s life in serious cases. In many countries, having a first aid kit in the office is a legal requirement. 

However, before you scramble for the first aid kit, try these five preventative measures to avoid workplace injuries:

1. Prioritise Rest

The effects of stress in the workplace are far-reaching and can prove problematic if left unchecked for too long. More often than not, such cases can be traced back to poor sleeping habits. Constant late hours and excessive device usage puts our minds and body in a hyper-excited state and deprives us of restorative rest.

This leads to fatigue, which is one of the most common reasons for workplace injuries. Be it from lack of sleep or excessive workloads, fatigue plays a significant role in determining situational and personal awareness. Shoot for a minimum of seven hours of uninterrupted rest and avoid accumulating a hefty sleep debt.

2. Use Aids if Necessary

If injured, you need to protect the afflicted area. Things like wrist and ankle sprains are pretty minor, but they can lead to dropped objects or falls. Wearing braces or using movement aids is not a sign of weakness; these devices promote recovery while also preventing any exacerbation of existing injuries.

3. Abstain from Drugs and Alcohol

Going out on a bender the night before can easily affect the way you work the next day, even if you’re used to heavy drinking. An altered perception of your physical surroundings can lead to accidents and serious injuries. Certain prescription drugs carry similar side effects. While recovering, and on medication that causes drowsiness, stay at home until you’ve completely recovered.

4. Highlight Safety Hazards

Tangled wires, exposed electrical outlets/wiring and loose fans/floorboards/ceiling panels are things that need to be immediately highlighted to HR upon identification. Aside from the obvious threat to occupational health and safety, these hazards could be indicative of a deeper systemic issue in the building/office.

5. Stay Home if Sick

Illnesses like flu tend to make us feel more tired than usual due to the stress our bodies are under while fighting infection. When you feel like deadweight, your ability to react to your surroundings is thoroughly compromised and it’s better to stay at home to avoid infecting anyone else. 

Final Thoughts on Workplace Safety

It’s one thing to clock in all sleepy-eyed after missing your morning coffee fix, but it’s another to be exhausted to the extent where you can’t even pay adequate attention to your surroundings. Accidents in the office are more common than you think, and a small error can easily snowball into something much worse causing injury to yourself or others. So take the precautions above, remain vigilant and stay safe at work! 

This October is National Safe Work Month in Australia. To find out more about this excellent initiative, visit the Safe Work Australia website.

To discuss how to combat fatigue within your workforce contact the WellteQ team.

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Winning the Hearts of Your Employees!

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heart health, stress management, nutrition, alcohol consumption, smoke free

Getting to the heart of the problem

Putting your heart into your work is a phrase that plenty of us are familiar with. While it may be an admirable work ethic, some people inadvertently take it too literally. As reports of job stress increases, the negative impact it has on health and wellness has become more prevalent. Short of packing things up and retiring to a private island (one can only dream!), what can we do to prevent our hearts from redlining? With World Heart Day coming up on 29 September, we have some top tips on how to look after your heart. 

Stress is Subjective

One man’s meat is another man’s poison. Not all of us react to work the same way–what you find stressful might be a walk in the park for someone else. Yet the ways stress in the workplace affect our heart health are far from ambiguous:

  • Panic attacks and spikes in blood pressure.
  • Emotional volatility and violent outbursts.
  • Poor sleep quality and low focus.
  • Compromised immune system.
  • Stress/binge eating as a coping mechanism.

Survival Mode

Stress can be divided into two types: short and long-term. Looming deadlines and double shifts may sound bad in theory, but the human body is surprisingly adept at handling short-term stress—even mental ones. However, long-term stress—like a new boss who micro-manages every single thing that you do—is a different story altogether. In both cases, your body produces hormones like adrenaline and cortisol as part of a natural survival response. When these hormones fail to dissipate after long periods of time, cholesterol levels increase and so does your risk of heart disease.

Keeping the Heart Strong

Proper nutrition and active living might be instrumental to good heart health, but even the best of efforts can be compromised when they’re exposed to a constant barrage of stress factors. Here are some measures you can take at the workplace (or any similar setting) to keep your heart strong:

Limit alcohol consumption

Yes, after work drinks on a Friday can be tempting, especially when everyone else at the office is doing it. However, it is all too easy for a drinking habit to spiral out of control. The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention lists excessive alcohol consumption as one of the top five lifestyle-related factors of heart disease, so this is far from an old wives’ tale. Many corporate wellness programs have ways to monitor your alcohol intake.

Stay smoke-free

Even if you’re a non-smoker, second-hand smoke can still affect you. If your social circle at work comprises regular smokers, then you may want to consider distancing yourself whenever they go and light up. Inhaling the smoke from others can lead to atherosclerosis, which can cause a heart attack or stroke. Organisations should ensure designated smoking areas are kept well away from non-smokers.

Regular health screenings

Some companies make regular health screenings mandatory for all employees. For those who are presented with an open option, you’d be remiss not to take advantage of it. Health screenings can help identify early signs of heart disease, allowing one to take action and receive treatment post-haste. The earlier the treatment, the higher the chance of making a complete recovery.

Peer counselling

Most stressed employees end up feeling this way due to their perception of being alone in their struggles. In such cases, having someone to lend a listening ear can be a soothing balm for even the most troubled of souls. Talking to a more experienced colleague who’s “been there, done that” might shed some new light on a grim situation. Sometimes, a new perspective might be all that you need to get things going again. As an employer, try encouraging a culture where your employees feel comfortable opening up to each other.

Meditation

You don’t have to roll out the yoga mat if you don’t want to, but basic practices like deep breathing and silent contemplation can be done in a workplace setting without creating a spectacle. Stuck at the desk for hours? Take a few minutes off for a short walk. Another key consideration of meditative practices is proper posture–something that is often lacking in the workplace. When combined with chest breathing, poor posture can affect your lungs’ ability to fully inflate and deflate. This lapse in oxygen intake and carbon dioxide expiration can raise one’s blood pressure, so don’t be a slouch (literally) at work! If you’re in charge of employee wellness, consider setting up regular meditation sessions for your workforce.

Take Heart! 

Heart disease can be mitigated through healthy behaviours. In a workplace environment, we often find ourselves forgoing common sense for the sake of productivity and “blending in”. While the thought of numerous work accolades might seem enticing, it should not have to come at the expense of your health. Your heart might be in your work, but you don’t want to reach a point where your heart NEEDS work.

To discuss how our digital wellness solution can keep your workforce “heart-healthy”, contact the WellteQ team.

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WellteQ Talks: Sleep and Cognitive Performance

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In this episode of WellteQ Talks, Scott talks to fitness expert Natalie, from the Daily Escape, about sleep and cognitive performance. How important is sleep to your performance regime?

To find out more about sleep and cognitive performance, get in touch with the WellteQ team.

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Four Common Myths Around Active Lifestyles!

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Active lifestyle

What’s holding you back from an active lifestyle?

When it comes to keeping fit, many of us are guilty of creating expectations on the time and level of disruption that such a change brings, which can put us off from pursuing an active lifestyle. 

Balancing Act

While staying active will affect your personal life, the idea that you can’t maintain a balance is untrue. Incorporating it into your lifestyle is far more progressive than most people realise, and the benefits are obvious. Like any other habit, it gets easier with time until it becomes almost second nature. 

One of the first things you should do is dispel the myths around active lifestyles. Here are four common myths we can squash right now!

1. There’s Isn’t Enough Time in the Week 

Many people have a fixed idea of how much time it takes to ‘get fit’. The truth is fitness regimes can (and should) be scaled to individual profiles. No one’s asking you to spend three hours in the gym every day when you already have a packed work schedule! From the number of days per week right down to the time per session, a good fitness plan should allow to make full use of the time you have available to you to get the results that you want.

Multitasking fitness

You can always make time to be active

2. Exercise is Exhausting 

Yes, training can be tiring, especially at the beginning. However, most take the exhaustive aspect of exercise a little too far. A good training session shouldn’t leave you feeling like a husk of your former self. In fact, research shows that staying active regularly maintains and even improves energy levels, focus and productivity. For this reason, it is not uncommon to see employers support fitness within the workplace via several initiatives like free fitness classes, discount gym memberships or corporate wellness programs.

Productivity

Working out doesn’t have to negatively impact productivity

3. Gyms Are So Expensive

While that shiny new gym with the oak interior, steam sauna and jacuzzi pool has every right to charge a hefty premium, it doesn’t mean that you can’t shop around! The fitness industry has come a long way since the ’80s – big-chain gyms and neighbourhood fitness clubs are no longer as polarising as they once were. It really isn’t all that uncommon to see smaller establishments offering the same staples as commercial gyms but at a lower cost, with some even offering special amenities such as 24-hour access. And even if it still exceeds your budget, there’s always the local park to get your sweat session on!

4. Staying Active Means Not Having a Social Life

You hear a lot of stories about how adopting an active lifestyles can affect your relationships, eg being phased out of a social circle for not wanting to drink alcohol the whole time. The truth is that there will be some people in your life who won’t be able to understand your desire to change initially, or even at all. The important thing is they understand how this is your decision and afford you the appropriate amount of respect. When it comes to your end, do your part by not shoving your new lifestyle change down their throats – adopting a holier-than-thou attitude is a sure-fire way to annoy people. You might even find that your active lifestyle leads to new relationships.

Friends at the gym

Social aspects of working out

Step in the Right Direction

Part of the reason why such myths exist is the level of change an active lifestyle requires. We are naturally averse to sudden change, so we come up with excuses to protect ourselves from the unfamiliarity. Yet, change has always been the thing that precedes progress. While you may never know for sure just how far you’ll end up going, rest assured that it will at least be a step in the right direction.

To discuss how you can motivate your workforce to be more active, get in touch with WellteQ today.

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Give up alcohol for a month

High and Dry – Why You Should Consider Dropping the Drinks This July

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Give up alcohol in Dry July

Bin the booze this Dry July!

 

Since as far back as mankind can recall, no consumption habit conveys a more socialising effect than that of alcohol. Whether it’s for letting off steam with colleagues after a hectic week, reconnecting with old friends or firming up business relations, grabbing a drink at the nearest pub seems to have cemented itself into our modern culture. In celebration of Dry July, consider putting down that drink and picking up a healthier habit instead.

Are You Ready for Dry July?

Yes, this July is all about hanging your booze mugs out to dry. While we’re all aware of the obvious benefits of staying sober (no more hangovers!), there are many other changes associated with adopting a teetotal lifestyle.

Whiskey-soaked Social Bonds

A huge majority of adults like to unwind and socialise over a few drinks, and many of our friendships are actually based around our shared love of alcohol. Yet, passing on the bar over the weekend can be quite a revelation. 

If you manage to rope your friends or colleagues in to join you in Dry July, then congrats – you’ve got a real bunch of pals! While it may seem like the absence of alcohol diminishes the joy of socialising, it actually gives you the opportunity to explore other activities with your friends – park yourselves in a board game café for an afternoon, race each other around a go-kart track or even join that circus fitness class you’re been talking about for ages!

You might very well find that you enjoy these alternative activities more than chugging on a flat beer.

Jump on the Wagon

Here are five other reasons that you should consider lowering your alcohol intake:

1. More money in the bank

Life’s too short to waste on lousy booze, but decent drinks don’t exactly come cheap either, especially if your city has a hefty tax on alcohol. Ultimately, a smaller (preferably non-existent) bar tab means a healthier bank balance. That means you get to either put more away for yourself or have more to play with when the time comes to splurge!

2. Increased productivity

No one likes being at work when their head feels like it’s hosting a party of overenthusiastic woodpeckers. Aside from not having to deal with hangovers, halting the drinks also frees up a bunch of personal time you never thought you had. You can pursue healthier and more restorative activities with your free time, which will lead to you feeling more refreshed and motivated when the time comes to get down to business.

3. Look (and feel) better

Most people who’ve dropped alcohol would agree that the changes are noticeable almost immeditely: weight loss, increased energy levels and improved sleep quality are just some of the physical benefits you can expect to receive.

4. Improved mental health

Alcohol is a depressant, so the more you drink, the more likely you are to feel blue. Easing up on the drink can improve mental wellness, eg less mood swings, decreased anxiety and increased motivation. 

5. Better judgment

You’re also less likely to make hasty decisions while inebriated – the kind that you always end up regretting immensely. You know exactly what we’re talking about – drunk texting is never a good idea!

Last Orders

You don’t have to stop drinking altogether if you’re the sort that enjoys some tipple every now and then. Leading a balanced lifestyle can include indulging in certain vices occasionally, as opposed to maintaining a regular habit of downing several glasses of the strong stuff. Take the time to find something else that you’d enjoy, and you may end up re-evaluating your view of drinking. Or at least try going dry for July and enjoy the benefits!

Team WellteQ are doing Dry July… follow our highs and lows on Instagram!

To discuss how WellteQ can help transform your workforce, get in touch today.

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